I love Michael Jackson

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Michael Jackson’s Art and Studio, Revealed for the First Time- Aug 17, 2011

Michael Jackson’s Art and Studio, Revealed for the First Time

The interior of Michael Jackson’s art studio, which he shared with friend and artist Brett-Livingstone Strong

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See more photos in “Michael Jackson Art: An Exclusive Look at the Musician’s Drawings and Paintings.”

Until now, Michael Jackson’s art collection was shrouded in mystery. It was said to be stuck in a legal dispute over possession. Then, people speculated that buyers such as Cirque du Soleil’s Guy Laliberté were interested. It’s been valued at the staggering (and slightly unbelievable) sum of $900 million.

One crucial fact: Jackson’s art collection isn’t art by other people — it’s mainly drawings and paintings that he created himself. So what does that art look like?

Yesterday, LA Weekly was the first to visit the (until now) top-secret Santa Monica Airport hangar that Jackson used as his studio and art storehouse. The collection is currently owned by Brett-Livingstone Strong, the Australian monument builder and Jackson’s art mentor through the years, in conjunction with the Jackson estate.

Though the entire art collection has been mired in disputes and battles for rights, Strong claims that he is working with everybody — the family, the estate, as well as others — to exhibit and publish as much of Jackson’s work as possible.

According to Strong, he and Jackson formed an incorporated business partnership in 1989, known as the Jackson-Strong alliance. This gave each partner a fifty-percent stake in the other’s art. In 2008, Strong says, Jackson requested that his attorney sign the rights to Jackson’s portion of the art over to Strong. Now, Strong is beginning to reveal more and more of the art as he goes ahead with Jackson’s dream of organizing a museum exhibit.

Some of Jackson’s original drawings hanging on the wall. Prints of these were donated to the L.A. Children’s Hospital.

Strong gave us a tour of the hangar, beginning with the Michael Jackson monument that Strong and Jackson co-designed several years ago. It’s perhaps bombastic, but designed with good intentions and the rabid Jackson fan in mind. Strong explains, “He wanted his fans to be able to get married at a monument that would have all of his music [in an archive, and playing on speakers], to inspire some of his fans.”

The current design is still in the works, but it’s conceived as an interactive monument — fans who buy a print by Jackson will receive a card in the mail. They can scan this card at the monument, and then have a computer organize a personal greeting for them, or allow them to book it for weddings. Jackson initially thought it would be perfect for Las Vegas, but Strong says that Los Angeles might have the honor of hosting it — apparently, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa recently paid a visit and made a few oblique promises.

As for Jackson’s art, the contents of the hangar barely scratched the surface of the collection, as Strong estimates Jackson’s total output at 150 to 160 pieces. A few large pieces hanging on the walls had been donated as reproductions to the L.A. Children’s Hospital last Monday, along with other sketches and poems.

In all of his art, certain motifs kept cropping up: chairs (usually quite baroque), gates, keys and the number 7. His portrait of Bubbles, his pet chimpanzee, shows a monkey-like face vanishing into a cushy, ornate lounge chair. “He loved chairs,” says Strong. “He thought chairs were the thrones of most men, women and children, where they made their decisions for their daily activity. He was inspired by chairs. Rather than just do a portrait of the monkey, he put it in the chair. And you see, there are a few sevens — because he’s the seventh child.”

Jackson, who was a technically talented artist — and completely self-taught — fixated on these motifs, elevating everyday objects into cult symbols. Strong added that Jackson’s sketchbooks are completely filled with studies of his favorite objects, in endless permutations.

MJ’s portrait of George Washington — he initially planned to do a series of all of the presidents, but never continued it.

But Jackson also created portraits: a small sketch of Paul McCartney, and a large drawing of George Washington, created as Strong was working with the White House to commemorate the bicentennial of the Constitution back in 1987. He also sketched self-portraits — one as a humorous four-panel drawing charting his growing-up process, and a darker one that depicts him as a child cowering in a corner, inscribed with a sentence reflecting on his fragility.

As an artist, Jackson preferred using wax pencils, though Strong adds, “He did do a lot of watercolors but he gave them away. He was a little intimidated by mixing colors.” Some surviving pencils are archived in the hangar; Strong moves over to a cabinet on the far wall of the hangar and pulls out a ziploc bag containing a blue wax pencil, a white feathered quill and a white glove that Jackson used for drawing.

Jackson turned to art as times got hard for him. “His interest in art, in drawing it, was just another level of his creativity that went on over a long period of time,” Strong says. “It was quite private to him. I think he retreated into it when he was being attacked by those accusations against him.” The sketches and drawings certainly reveal an extremely sensitive creator, though it’s clear that Jackson also had a sense of humor.

Jackson’s art was kept under wraps for such a long time simply because of the scandal, which erupted right around the time that he was looking for a way to publicize the works. “A lot of his art was going to be exhibited 18 years ago. Here’s one of his tour books, where he talks about exhibiting art. He didn’t want it to be a secret,” Strong says, pointing at a leaflet from the 1992 Dangerous World Tour.

Prior to that period, Jackson and Strong had met and become fast friends. This marked the beginning of Strong’s mentorship, in which he encouraged Jackson to create bigger paintings and drawings, and exhibit his work. The idea behind their Jackson-Strong Alliance was that Strong would help Jackson manage and exhibit his art. Notably, the alliance birthed Strong’s infamous $2 million portrait of Michael Jackson entitled The Book, the only known portrait Jackson ever sat for.

In 1993, everything blew up. At the time, Jackson and Strong were both on the board of Big Brothers of Los Angeles (now known as Big Brothers Big Sisters), a chapter of the national youth mentoring organization established in L.A. by Walt Disney and Meredith Willson. They had planned out a fundraising campaign involving Jackson’s art. Strong explains, “We thought that if we would market [his art] in limited edition prints to his fans, he could support the charities that he wanted to, rather than have everybody think that he was so wealthy he could afford to finance everybody.” When the scandal erupted, Disney put a freeze on the project. The artwork stayed put, packed away from public eyes in storage crates.

As for the spectacular appraisal of $900 million for Jackson’s art collection, Strong says that it derives from the idea of reproducing prints as well. The figure was originally quoted by Eric Finzi, of Belgo Fine Art Appraisers. “The reason somebody came out with that was because there was an appraisal on if all of his originals were reproduced — he wanted to do limited editions of 777 — and he would sell them to his fan base in order to build his monument, support kids and do other things. You multiply that by 150 originals, and if they sold for a few thousand dollars each, then you would end up with 900 million dollars.” Fair enough, though now Strong says he has gone to an appraiser in Chicago to get that value double-checked, and they arrived at an even higher estimate.

The story of Jackson’s art ends up being quite a simple one, though confused by so much hearsay and rumor. Strong and the Jackson estate will slowly reveal more works as time passes, and an exhibit is tentatively planned for L.A.’s City Hall. Negotiations with museums for a posthumous Jackson retrospective are still underway, but Strong has high hopes. He’s even talking of building a Michael Jackson museum that would house all of Jackson’s artwork.


Jackson’s sketch of the White House doors, to which he added the following quote from John Adams: “I pray heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this house and all that shall inhabit it. May none but honest and wise men [MJ’s addition:] or women rule under this roof.”

We’ll leave you with Strong’s own description of Jackson at work, during the time where they shared a studio in a house in Pacific Palisades:

He was in a very light and happy mood most of the time. He would have the oldies on, and sometimes he’d hear some of his Jackson Five songs. He’d kind of move along to that, but most of the time he would change it and listen to a variety of songs. He liked classical music. His inspiration to create was that he loved life, and wanted to express his love of life in some of these simple compositions.

I came to the studio one day, and we had a Malamute. I came into the house, and I heard this dog barking and thought, Wow, I wonder what that is. I go into the kitchen, and I couldn’t help but laugh when I see Michael up in the pots and pans in the middle of the center island. He’s holding a pen and paper and the dog is running around the island and barking at him, and he says, “He wants to play! He wants to play!” He’s laughing, and I’m laughing about it as I’m thinking to myself, “I’m wondering how long he’s been up there.”

Michael Jackson’s dedication to art: so strong that he’ll end up perched on a kitchen island.


Michael Jackson sang “Elizabeth, I Love You”..

February 1997, Michael Jackson was Elizabeth Taylor’s escort at her 65th Birthday celebration. Michael performed a special song he composed specifically for this occasion in honor of his friend Elizabeth. The song is titled “Elizabeth, I Love You” and reflects Michael’s love for her. Michael only performed this song once:

Elizabeth, I love you
(written and composed by Michael Jackson)

Welcome to Hollywood,
that’s what they told you.
A child star in Hollywood,
thats what they sold you.

Grace with beauty, charm and talent,
you would do what you were told
but they robbed you of your childhood,
took your youth and sold it for gold.

Elizabeth, I love you..
you’re every star that shines in the world to me.
Elizabeth, can’t you see that its true..
Elizabeth, I love you,
you’re more than just a star to me.

Lovely Elizabeth,
you have surpassed them all.
My friend Elizabeth,
learned to outlast them all.
Many started back when you did,
lost their way, and now they’re gone
but look at you, a true survivor,
living your life and carrying on.

Elizabeth, I love you,
you’re every star that shines in the world to me.
Elizabeth, can’t you see that its true.
Elizabeth, I love you,
you’re more than just a star.

This is your life, you seem to have it all.
you reached your peak
they wanted you to fall.
It’s very sad, this world can be so bad
But through all the heartaches when they put you down,
you were the victor and you earned the crown.
It’s like walking through fire determined to win,
you were beating life’s battles again and again.

Elizabeth, I love you,
you’re every star that shines in the world to me..
Elizabeth, can’t you see that its true.

Remember the time when I was alone,
you stood by my side and said ‘Let’s be strong’.
You did all these things that only a true friend can do..

Elizabeth, I love you.
The world knows your work now,
of all the things on earth now,
I pray one day I’ll be just like…you.

“I love Elizabeth Taylor. I’m inspired by her bravery. She has been through so much and she is a survivor. That lady has been through a lot and she walked out of it on two feet. I identify with her very strongly because of our experiences as child stars. When we first started talking on the phone, she told me she felt as if she had known me for years. I felt the same way. – Michael Jackson ~♥~


“The Giving Tree”

The “Giving Tree,” a tree in which Michael Jackson gets inspiration to write his songs.

“I called it my giving tree because it inspires me. I love climbing trees in general but this tree I loved the most because I climb up high and look down at its branches and I just love it… So many ideas. I’ve written so many songs from this tree. I wrote “Heal the World” in this tree, “Will you be there”, “Black or White”, “Childhood”. I love climbing trees. I think water balloon fights and climbing trees.. those are two of my favorites.” – Michael Jackson


Michael’s Anti Gravity Illusion – 1993

The King of Pop, Michael Jackson, was an inventor and received a United States Patent in 1993 for an invention. This creation provides a new design for shoes which allowed MJ to create the desired anti gravity visual effect during his performances.


In 1993 Michael Jackson wrote the introduction in a family cookbook “Pigtails and Frog Legs”

Pigtails and Frog Legs

“Food is something we all need physically, but so is love, the deeper nourishment, that turns into who we are.”


In 1993, Michael wrote the introduction to a cookbook for families published by Neiman Marcus, Pigtails and Frog Legs.  The book was illustrated by legendary Warner Bros. Cartoon artist Chuck Jones. Above is Jones’ portrayal of Michael.

“To a child, food is something special. It isn’t just a delicious taste or the vitamins that build a healthy body. Food is love and caring, security and hope — all the things that a food family can provide. Remember when you were little and your mother made a pie for you? When she cut a slice and put it on your plate, she was giving you a bit of herself, in the form of her love. She made your hunger go away, and when you were full and satisfied, everything seemed all right. Because that satisfied feeling was in the pie, you were nourished from a deep level. Food is something we all need physically, but so is love, the deeper nourishment, that turns into who we are.

Think about how necessary it is to nourish a child with a bit of yourself when you use this book. It is full of delicious things. Every recipe has an extra ingredient of caring, because the people who wrote them were thinking of the children. They were specially thinking of those who aren’t able to take nourishment for granted because they are poor, sick or disabled. These are the children who need food to heal. The theme of ‘Heal the World’, which has been close to my heart, is the central theme of this book, also. Here are recipes for the spirit. Please make them with that in mind. Your child is growing spirit that can be knit strong with love. When you break an egg and measure a cup of flour, you are magically mixing the gift of life. The food’s proteins and minerals will turn into bones and muscles, but your feeling as you cook will turn directly into a soul.

It makes me happy to think that the needs of children’s spirits are at last becoming important in this world. Children have no power to end wars directly or to mend age-old differences.

All they can do is be themselves, to shine with gratitude and joy when love is turned their way. Yet isn’t that ultimately the greatest power? In the eyes of a child you become the source of joy, which lifts you into the special category of caregiver and life-provider. You may think that your apple pie has only sugar and spice in it. A child is wiser — with the first bite, he knows that this special dish is the essence of your love.

Enjoy!”

— Michael Jackson, 1993


“The Fish That Was Thirsty” ~ Written by Michael, June 1, 1992

Michael Jackson’s first book of poems and essays, titled “Dancing The Dream” was released on June 1, 1992.

One night a baby fish was sleeping under some coral when God appeared to him in a dream. “I want you to go forth with a message to all the fish in the sea,” God said.

“What should I tell them?” the little fish asked. “Just tell them you’re thirsty,” God replied. “And see what they do.” Then without another word, He disappeared.

The next morning the little fish woke up and remembered his dream. “What a strange thing God wants me to do,” he thought to himself. But as soon as he saw a large tuna swimming by, the little fish piped up, “Excuse me, but I’m thirsty.” “Then you must be a fool,” then tuna said. And with a disdainful flick of his tail, he swam away.
The little fish did feel rather foolish, but he had his orders.
The next fish he saw was a grinning shark. Keeping a safe distance, the little fish called out, “Excuse me, sir, but I’m thirsty.” “Then you must be crazy,” the shark replied. Noticing a rather hungry look in the shark’s eye, the little fish swam away quickly.
All day he met cod and mackerels and swordfish and groupers, but every time he made his short speech, they turned their backs and would have nothing to do with him.

Feeling hopelessly confused, the little fish sought out the wisest creature in the sea, who happened to be an old blue whale with three harpoon scars on his side. “Excuse me, but I’m thirsty!” the little fish shouted, wondering if the old whale could even see him, he was such a tiny speck. But the wise one stopped in his tracks.

“You’ve seen God, haven’t you?” he said. “How did you know?” “Because I was thirsty once, too.” The old whale laughed. The little fish looked very surprised.
“Please tell me what this message from God means,” he implored. “It means that we are looking for Him in the wrong places,” the old whale explained. “We look high and low for God, but somehow He’s not there. So we blame Him and tell ourselves that He must have forgotten us. Or else we decide that He left a long time ago, if He was ever around.”
“How strange,” the little fish said, “to miss what is everywhere.”
“Very strange,” the old whale agreed. “Doesn’t it remind you of fish who say they’re thirsty?”

Michael’s Talents Beyond Music: 1988

(Upper left photo: 1988- Michael Jackson, Bubbles and Greg Hildebrandt at Helmsley Palace in NY)
Artist Greg on these photos: ” I was very fortunate to have had the opportunity to spend time with Michael in 1988, during his Bad Tour, and in 1989 at his ranch, Neverland Valley. In 1988, Michael invited me to spend ten days with him during his Tour. He was performing in NJ at the time. As I lived in NJ, I told him I would be happy to drive back and forth to the city but he insisted on getting me a suite at the Helmsley Palace. We spend many hours together and I went to every concert with him. It was truly a wonderful experience. What struck me from the first moment I met Michael was how intelligent he was. I of course knew his music and knew what an incredible performer he was, but I had no idea that he had deep passions for art and art history. He was especially passionate about American Illustrators.
We spent many hours talking about Maxfield Parrish, N.C. Wyeth, Howard Pyle, Jesse Wilcox Smith and of course his favorite Norman Rockwell. Michael sent an armored truck to my studio and they picked up over 150 of my paintings. They were leaning all around the suite and we spent quite a bit of time discussing my art and classic literature. Michael was also an avid book collector and I was surprised to find out that he had every book I had illustrated. But my greatest surprise are when he asked me to give him drawing lessons. I quickly learned that he had a natural talent for art. We would set and sketch, chat and eat pop corn. It was casual and enjoyable.”
August 2009 Michael’s drawing (lower right) was auctioned and sold at $21,000.00.